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Digging Deeper | Northwest Gardening ..
Swansons Nursery is proud to have been inspiring Northwest gardeners sinc..
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Erythronium species (also called Fawn Lily, Trout Lily or Dogtoothed Violet) epitomize the hidden wonders of the woodland garden. These ..read more
Editor’s Note: Swansons has Mason Bee materials in stock now! See the bottom of this post for list of Mason Bee resources ..read more
Happy National Bird-Feeding Month! February has been declared National Bird-Feeding Month and rightly so since winter is a tough time for ..read more
The promise of spring is in the air. Early-blooming plants are an antidote to the grey days of February in the Pacific Northwest. These ..read more
Often, one of my first orders of business when designing a garden is to embellish the immediate surroundings of the house. Carefully ..read more
The display of houseplants through the sculptural form of Kokedama has become increasingly popular, and it’s not surprising, for these ..read more
Have you ever wondered which indoor plants the people who work with plants every day love the most? We asked some of our employees to ..read more
Here comes another cold snap for the Puget Sound! And here are some quick tips for protecting your less-hardy plants from cold damage. ..read more
Nothing adds more beauty and comfort to our homes and offices than the lush flowers and foliage of indoor plants. Bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchens, offices... There really isn't a room a houseplant can't enliven. Just add light and water, and you've got not only a beautiful space but a cure for the winter blues. Really, I mean it. Houseplants will keep you healthier and happier. Multiple studies have found that indoor plants can offer psychological and physical health benefits,* including: improving your mood reducing fatigue lowering stress and anxiety improving office performance and focus boosting healing and pain tolerance minimizing the occurrence of headaches by improving air quality easing dry skin and respiratory ailments due to dry air Many houseplants absorb toxic substances such as formaldehyde, benzene and trichloroethylene, found in man-made materials that are known to "off-gas" pollutants into the air in your home, school, and office. In addition, a study done at Virginia Tech led researchers to conclude that houseplants can reduce indoor dust by up to 20%. Indoor plants release water vapor into the air, which increases humidity. This can help improve respiratory and skin health by offsetting the drying effects of heating systems. They also increase oxygen levels in the air by absorbing carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen during photosynthesis. According to a Seattle Times article, you can maximize these effects by placing plants "in your 'breathing zone,' within 6 to 8 square feet of where you normally sit or lie." NASA, who has done extensive studies of the role of houseplants in cleansing the air, hoping to capitalize on these benefits for future space stations, recommends 15-18 houseplants for a 1,800 square-foot house. See the houseplants NASA recommends to clean the air. While not all of us have room for quite that many plants, even just a few can be effective. Dr. Virginia Lohr, a professor of horticulture at Washington State University, suggests that filling as little as 2% of the room with plants will make an impact. For more indoor plant care tips, read our indoor plant blog posts and visit our NW Gardening Tips page. Editor's Note: A version of this blog post was published in October of 2014 as 7 Important Health Benefits of Houseplants. *Information drawn from the following sources: ..read more
THANK YOU so much to everyone who joined us this year and helped make our Kids’ Club program a big success! 2019 has been an eventful ..read more

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